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what to watch out for when buying cbd

You don’t have to buy the most expensive product on the market to be safe. Look for reasonable prices and favourable customer reviews.

If you’re looking for a reputable CBD oil producer, Cibdol features all the hallmarks of a trustworthy brand, including stringent quality control from field to bottle. Harnessed using state-of-the-art CO₂ extraction, all Cibdol CBD oils use the finest non-GMO hemp grown without chemical fertilisers, pesticides, herbicides, or other toxic contaminants. We sell only the best, 100% natural CBD oil products with published batch testing to back up every product and every claim.

3. The price isn’t too good to be true

Research, as well as personal accounts, make it clear that CBD is a remarkable compound, but it’s not approved as a medical treatment by any government agency. That means it falls into the same category as vitamins and other supplements, and no company can legally claim that it treats or cures any medical condition, with a few very specific exceptions. If you’re looking at a CBD oil that makes claims like that, steer clear—it’s probably too good to be true.

Before buying CBD oil, check to see if the company has its products verified by independent testing facilities. A company you can trust will make these results public. The information might be on the bottle, the box it came in, on an insert, or published on the website. If you can’t find it there, then it is time to start asking questions. Most companies with consistently good results are so proud of them that they’ll make the reports easy to find.

Test results that you can view and verify are essential because they will state the levels of both CBD and THC, plus a heavy metals analysis. If you can’t find this information, be very wary.

If the product makes outlandish health claims, avoid it.

The negative effects of taking too much CBD may include upset stomach and diarrhea, according to the FDA, which also warns that CBD may potentially cause liver injury or negatively interact with other medications.

3. Inspect the label and ask for third-party test results

Cannabis reviewer Leafly recently tested 47 products and found that nearly half delivered within 20 percent of the advertised amount of CBD (getting within the 20 percent range is somewhat of an industry standard). Four, including Platinum X CBD Cherry Lollipops and CBD Living Water, delivered none at all.

“If a company promises 300 mg of CBD and actually delivers 300 mg, it’s probably not cutting corners in other areas,” according to Leafly.

Plenty of cannabis advocates scorn isolate and trumpet full-spectrum. (Although there’s no industry-wide definition of full-spectrum beyond it contains more than one cannabinoid.) The CBD works best when interacting with other elements in the plant, they claim. Terpenes and flavonoids found naturally in cannabis (the compounds that impact smell and flavor) can also have other effects, like making one feel relaxed or tired. Again, more research needs to be done to provide greater clarity here, but evangelists of the so-called entourage effect point to this 2011 study to bolster their arguments.

While the 2018 Farm Bill (or Agriculture Improvement Act) removed hemp-derived CBD from the list of illegal drugs, it also left the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in charge of oversight. The agency has been clear that CBD-infused products are not approved for sale or use in humans or animals, but that hasn’t stopped some states from creating their own laws.

CBD oils are popular and therefore not cheap in the current market. A 1-ounce, or 30-milliliter, bottle of CBD oil can cost between $30 and $200. While it’s difficult to say what’s a fair price for CBD, a lab-tested product typically costs $50 to $60 per 1,000 milligrams.

Is CBD oil legal?

To meet federal legal criteria, CBD oil must contain no more than 0.3 percent THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Some CBD oil labels are fraught with marketing terms and buzzwords that appear to signify medicinal value. Terms such as “organic,” “all-natural,” and even “pure” have no scientific meaning, and shouldn’t be considered a sign of a trustworthy CBD oil. Products claiming to contain hemp or hemp seed oil aren’t the same as hemp-derived CBD oil, and won’t necessarily contain any CBD. Cannabis-derived CBD oil is produced from cannabis plants that contain THC above 0.3%.

Most reputable CBD oils include the following information on their labels: