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thc cbd cbn oil

Research to date supports CBD for the possible treatment of the following:

At that point, our understanding of cannabinoids in general — and CBN in particular — began to morph. It was soon discovered that CBN is actually a by-product of THC content, produced when THC oxidizes. Basically, as THC is exposed to heat and light, it breaks down into CBN.

In fact, cannabidiol is widely believed to have a regulatory effect, counteracting the potentially adverse effects of THC, such as anxiety and paranoia. Several studies support the finding that high doses of THC can cause anxiety or paranoia in otherwise healthy users and individuals with a predisposition for mental illness. However, the presence of CBD tends to mellow out these effects, producing a more manageable (and oftentimes more enjoyable) high.

Frequently asked questions

CBN has also shown potential as a treatment for sleep disorders, pain relief, and inflammation, among other medical benefits. For instance, in an analysis shared by Steep Hill Labs in 2017, researchers found that a 2.5-to-5 milligram dose of CBN was as effective as a 5-to-10 milligram dose of the pharmaceutical sedative diazepam. This claim should be taken with a grain of salt, as it was not published in a peer-reviewed journal.

For example, a 2011 study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found that THC in combination with CBN may produce a more sedated, “couch-locked” body high. This may be why older cannabis products or those exposed to a lot of heat and sunlight, such as Moroccan hashish, are said to produce more pronounced relaxing effects than other forms of marijuana.

Bottom line: While it can be helpful to understand the difference between CBN vs CBD, if you want to tap into the full range of effects and health benefits of cannabis, it may ultimately be better to consume it as a whole rather than as isolated parts.

Old cannabis or cannabis extracts left unrefrigerated or in the light will have higher levels of CBN. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

It’s important to note that cannabinoids can have profoundly different effects on different people, so there is no guarantee that just because CBD products didn’t work for you that this product will. Also, some people find CBN to be slightly intoxicating, while others do not feel any intoxication.

CBN:CBD Oil is typically used for calming nighttime relief that our standard CBD extracts can’t fully solve. It can also be used by individuals looking to boost their standard CBD or THC treatments.

Anecdotal evidence suggests CBN is exceptional for calming, night-time relief. Due to the extended government prohibition against cannabis, the formal studies supporting these results are lacking, but this oil is commonly used by individuals who find typical high CBD extracts just aren’t enough. CBN Oil can also be added to THC therapies to elevate its effects.

Product Description

CBN and CBD operate differently within the body. CBN binds to both CB1 and CB2 receptors, a trait shared with THC, except CBN does not have the same level of intoxicating effects. CBD does not bind either CB1 or CB2 receptors but instead seems to alter the way in which other cannabinoids bind those receptors. So together these two cannabinoids can work synergistically to activate different receptors and produce different neurotransmissions and subsequently different effects than a high CBD extract, CBD isolate, or CBN isolate product.

This CBN:CBD Oil is a 1:1 broad-spectrum blend of equal parts cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD). It also has trace amounts of CBG, CBC, and CBDv with a focused terpene blend and no THC.

CBN:CBD Oil is a premium hemp extract used for calming nighttime relief that our standard CBD extracts can’t fully solve. CBN tinctures are often used by individuals looking to boost their standard CBD or THC treatments. It comes with a metered dropper for accurate dosing.

Our CBN:CBD Oil also has a terpene blend with a high concentration of beta-caryophellene, a terpene that acts like a cannabinoid and binds CB2 receptors, as well as a range of other terpenes to help bring out the maximum potential effects of the cannabinoids.

CBD

For anyone looking to dip their toe into the cannabinoid world, CBD is widely considered the safest place to start. It’s also a cost effective option, and since its become popular enough to result in major competition, there are an endless amount of companies to choose from. Many products available are also third-party lab tested, and the test results are often available to customers on the manufacturer’s website or on scannable QR codes on the packaging.

CBD is sold as tinctures, edibles, vaporizer oils, and in ointments. You can still smoke it, too; The company Cannaflower, for one, offers an assortment of high-quality CBD-rich hemp flowers that could easily be mistaken for top-shelf marijuana. More than that, though, businesses have tried adding it to practically every product imaginable: Sandwiches, ice cream, coffee, candles and even clothing have been sold containing CBD. Given its reputation for providing relaxation without any intoxicating effects, the cannabinoid has also become a popular option for nervous dogs who are frightened by thunder and fireworks.

Chris Walsh, the CEO and president of Marijuana Business Daily, recently told Newsweek that “interest from both the industry and consumers is absolutely growing and you’re going to see a bigger focus on these other cannabinoids going forward.” Like CBD, these lesser-known compounds from cannabis plants reportedly offer wellness benefits, but it’s important to know what suits each individual’s needs.

Cannabinoids are simply the compounds found in cannabis. There is a huge range of estimates as to how many cannabinoids are in cannabis, since most exist at such low levels that scientists have historically had difficulty detecting them. Most estimates put the number of cannabinoids at somewhere over hundred, including some that state there are more than 140. With most still unknown, the main focus over the years has been on tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and CBD.