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side effects of cannabidiol oil

Generally speaking, CBD is considered a safe substance when applied topically or taken orally. There are, however, some potential side effects to keep in mind when using this substance, the majority of which are mild.

Because CBD supplements come in so many different forms—such as oils, gummies, tinctures, and vapors—the amount that’s actually absorbed can vary drastically. This, combined with each person, will ultimately affect which (if any) CBD side effects you might experience.

Drowsiness

She adds, “[Another difference is that] CBD is derived from hemp and has been classified as a legal substance. Hemp has <0.3% THC. Conversely, cannabis plants such as marijuana are grown to have much higher levels of THC and are still illegal according to the FDA, although individual states vary as to their use.”

Wendy Rose Gould is a lifestyle reporter with over a decade of experience covering health and wellness topics.

It’s important to point out that CBD is not regulated by the FDA and therefore dosages might not be accurate. It’s also difficult to know what an appropriate dose is the first time you try a new product.

These trials will double the number of preexisting clinical trials that have been carried out for cannabidiol, and it’s just the beginning. Will some of the promising benefits of CBD prove wrong when tested clinically? Most likely. People are currently trying to treat countless conditions with CBD, and it’s likely that a few of them might not be any more effective than placebo when tested with clinical trials.

For many of us, it may seem as though cannabidiol (CBD) sprang up out of nowhere. Within a few short years, this obscure molecule found in cannabis plants has moved from near-anonymity to a cure-all embraced by millions.

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When looking through the thousands of scientific articles referencing CBD, it’s very difficult to find any evidence of dangerous side effects or contraindications. However, widespread use of concentrated CBD is a very new phenomenon, and your safety is our priority.

You have low blood pressure. (Could be important) Some studies report that CBD lowers blood pressure, which could be a concern for people already dealing with low blood pressure. Overall, CBD appears most effective at reducing blood pressure during stressful events , which is widely embraced as one of its benefits. But CBD might also temporarily decrease your resting blood pressure as well. If you suffer from hypotension, you might want to monitor your blood pressure when trying new CBD products or increasing your dose. Are you the type that gets a bit light headed when you stand up suddenly? Just be a bit more cautious if you’ve just used a CBD vape pen or if you’ve been taking high oral doses of CBD.

So we thought we’d compile all the negative scientific evidence into one handy guide, to help you decide whether CBD is right for you. We’ll cover the different side effects you might encounter and what they could mean, as well as what current research says about trying CBD if you are:

Outside of these two disorders, CBD’s effectiveness in treating seizures is uncertain. Even with Epidiolex, it is uncertain whether the anti-seizure effects can be attributed to CBD or some other factor.

Common symptoms include:

CBD oil can interact with certain medications, including some drugs used to treat epilepsy. CBD inhibits an enzyme called cytochrome P450 (CYP450), which metabolizes certain drugs. By interfering with CYP450, CBD may either increase the toxicity or decrease the effectiveness of these drugs.

Seizures

Cathy Wong is a nutritionist and wellness expert. Her work is regularly featured in media such as First For Women, Woman's World, and Natural Health.

CBD oil may also increase liver enzymes (a marker of liver inflammation). People with liver disease should use CBD oil with caution, ideally under the care of a doctor who can regularly check blood liver enzyme levels.

Potential drug-drug interactions with CBD include:

CBD oil may benefit those with drug addiction, suggests a 2015 review of studies published in Substance Abuse.