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mayo clinic cbd oil

While it’s generally well tolerated, CBD can cause side effects such as dry mouth, diarrhea, reduced appetite, drowsiness and fatigue. CBD can also interact with other medications you’re taking, such as blood thinners. Another cause for concern is the unreliability of the purity and dose of CBD in products since they aren’t regulated. CBD products can also be quite expensive.

CBD is a chemical derived from Cannabis sativa (marijuana). CBD contains little or no delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that produces a high. The usual CBD formulation is oil, but CBD is also sold as an extract, vaporized liquid or oil-based capsule.

A: Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is popular for symptom relief in a number of ailments. While it’s mostly considered safe, it’s not without risks.

Reported uses for CBD include relief from:

The only CBD product approved by the Food and Drug Administration is a prescription oil called Epidiolex. It’s approved to treat two types of epilepsy. Aside from Epidiolex, state laws on CBD vary. Some states place specific medical restrictions on who can purchase CBD products, while other states may allow people to obtain them openly at a dispensary or store.

If I were you, I’d use our Body Creme 525 CBD:CBG. It’s what I use. It offers quick relief from arthritis pain, and it’s a topical, offering quicker results. I hope this helps! -Joan

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8 thoughts on “Mayo Clinic Weighs in on CBD – offers Dosage Suggestions”

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Hi Diana, I don’t know where you’ve purchased this item from. I hope you asked for the lab results of what’s in that bottle. Assuming you did, I would start with figuring out the CBD dosage per dose. It’s a 300 mg Tincture bottle, if it’s in a one ounce bottle, then most likely, there are 30 doses per bottle.’check the label. If those assumptions are correct, then one dose is only 10 mg. That’s less than my customers give their pets.
Most adults use 500-1000 mg Tinctures.

THE MAYO CLINIC WEIGHS IN ON CBD – OFFERS DOSAGE SUGGESTIONS.

I have just received a supply of b+ pure cbd in the mail. This is all new to me. I have arthritis in my joints which includes somewhat crippled arthritic hands. I am searching for relief. The cbd oil comes in 300mg bottles. From what I read above I’m wondering is this is too much of a daily dose for me.

The big takeaway from the review is that no one knows exactly how effective or safe CBD really is. The researchers argue that more research on humans is needed to confirm many of the health claims made on the packaging of products containing CBD, short for the Cannabis-derived compound cannabidiol.

Ultimately, everything we do comes with a risk, Mauck says. With time and more research, the potential risks and benefits will become clearer.

CBD Confusion

The Mayo Clinic encourages physicians to keep “a clinical curiosity and a healthy skepticism” about CBD. Even though the FDA hasn’t approved any CBD or hemp oil products, besides the purified CBD oil for epilepsy, patients continue to ask for and use CBD products to self-medicate. As the CBD market explodes, more and more people are likely to try it. It’s crucial doctors remain informed and confident in guiding patients to use or not use CBD.

Choosing a high-quality CBD product can be hard. The laws and regulations around the substance are confusing and conflicting, and it is regulated differently at the state and federal level, which complicates decision-making for consumers and physicians.

“I think it’s really too early to just try anything that you get at the gas station,” Karen Mauck, M.D., co-author on the Mayo Clinic Proceedings journal and internist at the Mayo Clinic, tells Inverse. “Unless you’re a much more educated consumer getting it from these medical dispensaries, I think it’s too early to really take them for any sort of therapeutic effect right now.”