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is cbd hemp oil legal in pennsylvania

The Bill defined marijuana as a substance with more than 0.3% THC and hemp-derived CBD less than 0.3% THC by weight. President Donald Trump then signed the 2018 Hemp Farm Bill in December 2019, which removed hemp from the Controlled Substance list.

Recreational use of cannabis in PA is, however, still considered illegal in the state. If you are found in possession of recreational marijuana, you risk a fine of $500 and 13 months of jail time. You are also required to be 18 years and older to use CBD hemp oil.

Is CBD oil Legal in Pennsylvania?

When it comes to Pennsylvania, the exciting bit is that medical marijuana became legal in Pennsylvania before CBD oil ever did. Pennsylvania legalized medical marijuana in April 2016 and initiated a medical marijuana program. A couple of months later, in July 2016, the Industrial Hemp Research Act came into effect and legalized the production of hemp as well as CBD oil.

Rachel Levine, the Health Secretary in Pennsylvania, approved to expand the dispensary option menus in April 2018 to include marijuana flower based on the idea that it could be vaporized because the Bill outlawed smoking.

Thankfully, yes! CBD is legal to sell, buy, and use in Pennsylvania. However, there is a catch – the oil has to be derived from industrial hemp.

Here are several other CBD oil stores in Pennsylvania that carry high-quality CBD goods:

In Erie, you will find several high-quality vape stores that offer a wide selection of CBD goods, as well as vaping and smoking accessories:

Staying in Harrisburg? While the city doesn’t boast an impressive number of brick-and-mortar stores, two places are spot-on:

OTHER CBD OIL SHOPS IN PENNSYLVANIA

First of all, buying CBD oil online is fast and easy. It only takes a few minutes to complete your purchase, not to mention that in most cases, your products will be shipped within 24 hours after your order is placed.

Pittsburgh has a couple of stores for CBD consumers, too. The local shops are praised for their knowledgeable and friendly customer service, so if you need professional advice on your CBD options, go ahead and visit some of the addresses below.

Yes and no. CBD can be sourced from both hemp and marijuana – as you may guess, different laws apply to those two varieties of the cannabis plant.

Royal CBD – Full Spectrum

CBD is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in cannabis. After tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) is the second-most abundant cannabinoid in the plant and has many potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressant properties. CBD can be sourced from both marijuana plants and hemp plants, which are legal in most countries as they contain minuscule amounts of THC.

Hemp growers must be licensed by the PDA. Licenses are $600 per year for up to five locations, with additional fees for more locations; the state doesn’t limit the number of locations or acreage. Licenses will not be granted to anyone convicted of a drug felony in the 10 years prior to application. Growers who unintentionally violate the law will be given an opportunity to remedy the charges against them. If it happens three times in a five-year period, the grower is banned from producing hemp for five years. Growers who intentionally violate the law will be reported to law enforcement.

What is CBD?

In July 2016, Pennsylvania lawmakers passed House Bill 967, legalizing hemp cultivation and processing, including hemp-derived CBD production. It was one of many states that moved to regulate hemp production as an agricultural commodity in the wake of the 2014 Farm Bill. Later amendments to the state’s agricultural code removed requirements for hemp growers to be part of a university-affiliated research program.

Hemp and hemp-derived products are legal in Pennsylvania and overseen by the state’s Department of Agriculture. Pennsylvania has carefully detailed rules about growing hemp, from seed procurement to crop testing, but on anything other than that, it simply says citizens are responsible for following state and federal laws.

The 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act categorized all types of cannabis, including hemp, as Schedule I, defined as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction. The act prevented further research that may have shed light on beneficial uses for cannabis.