How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds In Peat Pellets

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Transplanting Cannabis Seedlings Into Jiffy Pellets If your initial germination process was successful, it’s time to move your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets. The goal of this process is Jake Randall is a journalist, author, and student with expertise in all things cannabis (especially edibles), along with knowledge in economics, the environment, and everything in between. Originally from Canada, Jake has taken on the role of a senior cannabis correspondent at The Cannabis School. In this guide, we’ll walk through the cannabis life cycle. When thinking about growing cannabis,…

Transplanting Cannabis Seedlings Into Jiffy Pellets

If your initial germination process was successful, it’s time to move your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets. The goal of this process is to provide new sprouts with a medium in which they can establish a small, but strong root zone.

New growers often skip the first stage of germination and sow cannabis seeds directly into moist soil, only later to be disappointed when seeds cease to sprout. This fruitless process can be caused by two reasons. First, if the soil is too wet, seeds can become waterlogged and turn to rot; second, cannabis seeds germinating in soil often have an unpredictable trajectory. If sown too deep, for example, the taproot may search for oxygen above ground and send the rest of the plant deeper into the soil. With the paper towel method, however, cannabis seedlings have the best chance of successful germination. Once the taproot is exposed, growers can avoid root rot, successfully predict the trajectory of the plant and safely transfer seedlings into their next home.

Ready to get growing? Watch our YouTube Series or read the following article to learn more about transplanting cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets.

Step #1: Soak Jiffy Pellets

Jiffy’s are small, cost-effective, compressed peat pellets. Because of their size and highly porous nature, Jiffy pellets are ideal for germination. Begin the process by preparing a nutrient solution of B vitamins and water. B vitamins reduce plant stress during transition phases of growth, promote root development, and usually contain absorbable elements like potassium. About 2 liters or half a gallon of water will be sufficient for hydrating four Jiffy Pellets.

After the nutrient solution is prepared, toss your Jiffy pellets in to soak. Wait 5-10 minutes for the Jiffy’s to adequately absorb the nutrient solution. You can check if your Jiffy’s are prepared by gently squeezing the outside of the pellet. If any pieces of peat haven’t been loosened, place them back into the nutrient solution for another 5 minutes. Once the Jiffy pellets are thoroughly soaked, gently wring them out and place them to the side. Like the paper towel method, the goal of this process is not to bog down your seedlings with a soaking wet environment, but rather provide them with a moist, dark area, with high levels of humidity.

Step #2: Transplanting Seedlings Into Jiffy Pellets

Examine each sprout: if the taproot is at least ¼” long, they are ready to be transplanted into jiffy pellets. Carefully take each seedling and place them in their respective pellet with the taproot facing down. Tweezers may be useful in this task, as long as they have been sanitized beforehand with boiling water, alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. Finally, gently cover the seed shell in a small amount of soil. Do not compress any of the topsoil covering the seed. The point of layering the shell in soil is just to provide your germinating seeds with an adequate amount of darkness and humidity.

Step #3: Place Seedlings in a Germination Tray and Dome

Take your expanded jiffy pellets and place them in a standard 10” x 20” germination tray. Then, cover them with an appropriate 4” or 7” humidity dome. Since your seedlings will be living in this tray for the next 10-14 days, there are several tools available to help manage and control the environment. A light source, heating mat, and digital thermometer/hygrometers are just a few examples of tools needed to stabilize the environment within this tray. Here are some of the features of each piece of equipment:

Lighting:

Choose a low-wattage, low-intensity light source. T5 fluorescents or LED lighting is a great option to consider. At this stage, the light source is only there to encourage upward movement, not vigorous growth.

Heat Mat:

A heating mat’s purpose is to raise the temperature of a small space to an adequate level. Especially during the colder seasons, a heating mat may be essential for providing your seedlings with a constant temperature of at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21C). Also, consider purchasing a heat mat temperature control gauge to maximize the efficiency of your tools.

Digital Monitors:

The purpose of a digital thermometer/hygrometer is to measure the constant temperature and humidity of a given space. Some monitors even come with extended probes, allowing you to measure the temperature/humidity of specific sections of the humidity dome. For the best outcome, attempt to keep your seedlings in an environmental range of 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit (21-24C) and a minimum 70-80% relative humidity

Step #4: Set It, But Don’t Forget It

Over the next few weeks, your seedlings will begin to develop a root zone that will spread through the jiffy pellet. Also, the “true leaves” of your seedlings will begin to appear. Unlike the “sucker leaves” which first emerge from the seed shell, true leaves will be much larger, resemble typical cannabis leaves, and indicate future growth, progression and plant establishment.

This period of growth will be slow: in some cases, the transition period can take up to 14 days. So, don’t worry if you can’t see measurable growth overnight. Set your plants up for success, leave them be, but don’t forget them. Monitor your tools, control levels of temperature and humidity, and if necessary, spray your plants with a light solution of B vitamins or liquid seaweed solution. Be patient and soon enough, your seedlings will be ready to continue growing as established plants during the vegetative stage.

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Join us for more information about growing cannabis at home! For more information on transplanting your cannabis seedlings into jiffy pellets, contact our team at Grow Your Four.

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By the end of week 8, your plants will likely be ready for harvest. Harvesting cannabis involves the important process of carefully drying plants to preserve and protect unique flavors and aromas. Much like the process of aging fine wine, carefully drying your crop has the potential to exaggerate the

How to Germinate Cannabis Seeds

How to germinate cannabis seeds with for beginners the easiest possible way. This was my first time growing indoor cannabis in my entire life. I had no clue where to start, so I just bought some cannabis seeds and told myself I would figure out the rest later.

The first problem I faced was how to germinate the seeds.. what does germinate even mean?

Seedlings breaking through the dirt.

“Germination is the process by which an organism grows from a seed or similar structure. The most common example of germination is the sprouting of a seedling from a seed”

Materials and Equipment Used:

What does germinating a cannabis seed mean?

Germination is the process of getting the seedling to begin sprouting/growing. So the problem I faced was finding the most efficient method of doing this. I did my research online and there were a few different ways, but I found them very unclear.

Seedlings a week after germination.

Germinating a cannabis seed with a paper towel for beginners

There is one common method where you drop the seedling in water for 24 hours. Then transport the seed into a wet piece of paper towel, which is then placed in a ziplock. Then after a few days, you need to carefully transport them into the soil. This methods success rate is a lot lower due to all the different variables and careful handling required to do it.

I saw this method and thought to myself there must be an easier way. To germinate cannabis seeds for beginners this is too hard. Then I started finding more and more people talk about jiffy pellets. I did my research and found some very interesting things. The first being that all you need to do is add water. That’s it.

How to germinate cannabis seeds for beginners with jiffy pellets

After discovering jiffy pellets I quickly decided this was the route I’d take in starting my first indoor cannabis grow.

I bought a pack of 36 jiffy pellets as the 12 pack was out of stock. When starting this you need to choose how many plants you want. I wanted to grow 4 plants.

Jiffy Pellets are the best invention I have come across. Here is a link to Amazon to check them out.

How to Germinate Cannabis Seeds Step by Step Guide

Here is a 6 step guide on how to germinate cannabis seeds for beginners using jiffy pellets. This method was 100% successful for me and i wanted to share it with everyone else looking to start growing for the first time.

Step 1: Decide how many plants you want to grow

I want to grow four plants in total. Therefore to be on the safe side I planted 50% more than I intended to grow in case anything happened.

So I planted 6 feminized auto-flowering seeds in 6 separate jiffy pellets.

I planted 50% more seeds then I wanted in the event some didn’t sprout or died in the early stages. I planted 1 seed per jiffy and cannabis seeds can be expensive.

Step 2: Add water to the jiffy pellet

You need to let the jiffy pellet absorb water so it expands. I added 35 mL of water to the pellet using a plastic syringe. Once it had absorbed all the water I peeled back the mesh and dug a small hole in the center. The hole was about half an inch deep.

Step 3: Place cannabis seeds inside the jiffy pellet

I then carefully placed the cannabis seeds inside the hole with a small pair of tweezers. This ensures no harm is done with my fingers. After placing in the dirt, I covered up the hole carefully. I did this for all six pellets.

Step 4: Wait for cannabis seeds to sprout

Once planted you need to leave them inside the container at room temperature for up to eight days. The germination process takes anywhere from 2 – 8 days to get the seedlings to sprout. After the first 24 hours, the pellets seemed very dry. I then proceeded to add a little water to each to keep them moist.

Cannabis seeds sprouting from the jiffy pellets after two days.

After waiting a gruelling 56 hours (Just over two days) I was going to sleep and noticed the first seedlings erecting from the jiffy pellets. It worked! Over the next 24 hours, the others sprouted one by one. This happened until all six plants were standing strong. The jiffy pellets had a 100% success rate. This was amazing for my grow. After they sprout they are ready to be placed under your grow lights (or in the sun if your doing it that way)

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The other three sprouted one day after this.

Step 5: Transplant the pellets into your pots

Day 3, I moved the cover off the jiffy pellet structure. I had my grow pots already in place and filled with them with soil. The jiffy pellets have a fabric string cover that holds all the dirt together. It says you can leave it on but I didn’t want to damage the roots and I wanted them to be able to grow freely. I carefully cut each mesh with a sharp knife.

Unfortunately, each pellet was left a little to long and the roots had started growing through the mesh. When trying to remove the mesh from around the pellets, the roots were stuck and the endings of all of them ripped off ☹ But the plants are doing GREAT!

Furthermore, I cut around the mesh so it was just the jiffy pellet by itself. I dug a small hold in the middle of my Vivosun 3 gallon fabric woven pots These pots allow oxygen to flow through the walls and allow the plant to grow to the maximum potential. I then transported the pellets into the holes I dug in the middle of the pots.

Step 6: Water the plants and start the grow!

After they were transported I watered them generously. Each day the leaves started growing bigger and bigger until I could see the ridged edge leaves start appearing.

Now the grow actually starts !

After one week under the LED grow lights the plants are looking bigger than ever !

My results from the germination process

In conclusion, for the first time ever growing indoors, I couldn’t have thought of a more easy process.

  • The seeds are already growing in soil when they sprout.
  • There is no transplant risk associated because the roots have already secured the structure.
  • All you do is place the seed inside the wet pellet.
  • Then all you have to do is wait for them to sprout.
  • Transplant to your pot and you’re all done!

If I had to rate this process compared to others it absolutely blows them out of the park. To germinate cannabis seeds for beginners this is the best method. There is no secondary care needed. Just place the seed inside and wait. I was so excited to write this blog as I knew I had to share this process with every other beginner grower trying to germinate seeds for the first time.

This germination method is the best I have seen and the success rate backs that claim up. I have a 6/6 , 100% germination success rate. That’s pretty good for the first time.

Let me know if this article helped you out ! Good luck growing !

Jake Randall is a journalist, author, and student with expertise in all things cannabis (especially edibles), along with knowledge in economics, the environment, and everything in between. Originally from Canada, Jake has taken on the role of a senior cannabis correspondent at The Cannabis School.

Germination Guide

If you are starting with seeds, you’ll have to germinate them to get the grow started. In this chapter, you’ll learn all about the natural conditions that cannabis seeds germinate under and then we’ll show you a failsafe way to germinate your seeds.

What is germination?

A cannabis seed is just an embryonic plant enclosed in a protective shell and germination is the process of reactivation of metabolic machinery of the seed. The outer shell splits apart and the embryonic plant emerges as a seedling. For cannabis seeds, this process takes between 1 and 7 days.

What makes seeds germinate?

Cannabis seeds lie dormant until they meet the right conditions to begin germination. In tropical conditions, cannabis seeds germinate in the warm rains of early spring. The well-drained soil of the forest floor wouldn’t be waterlogged, but it wouldn’t dry out. The ideal temperatures would be between 70°F-80°F (21°C-26°C), with 60-80% relative humidity. These spring seasonal signals tell the embryonic plant contained in the seed that conditions are right to begin its life cycles. These are the same conditions you will emulate to germinate seeds.

What’s the easiest way germinate cannabis seeds?

Peat moss pellets are pucks of dried peat moss enclosed in a fine netting. As a mostly inert medium that retains water well, peat moss pellets do a great job of mimicking the natural conditions of spring jungle floor.

What you need

Peat moss pellets – Get them online or at local department/hardware stores – they are widely available.
Filtered water – You probably have this in your fridge. pH balance between 5.5 and 6.5.
Cannabis seeds – Learn more about cannabis seeds in our guide

Step 1 – Flood the Peat Moss

Peat plugs come dried and compressed, so you need to flood them with water. Use some warm filtered water from your fridge, rainwater, or distilled water that’s pH balanced between 5.5 and 6.5. Add water until the plugs are saturated, then drain the excess water. The plugs will swell 4-5x their original volume.

Step 2 – Insert Seed

Most plugs or pellets have a small hole in the top. Insert the seed between 1/4-1/2″ (6-12MM) deep and lightly cover with an excess medium.
All emerging seedlings look identical, and most mature plants look very similar. If you start multiple strains at once, make sure to label them. Plastic plant labels can be fixed to peat moss plugs to identify the plant through its life – adding dates makes it a self-contained record.

Step 3 – Wait for it!

The next few days is mostly a waiting game. Put the pellets in a partially covered container to prevent drying out and follow these two simple rules:

DO keep the pellets warm and moist throughout germination, cannabis seeds germinate best in these conditions.
DO NOT flood or over-saturate the pellets after the initial flooding, since this will prevent the roots from getting enough oxygen. Too much water and the seedling will ‘damp out’ and fail.

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One easy method to ensure that you get the right amount of water is to use a spray bottle to wet the outside edges. Another is to quickly dip the bottom of the pellets into the water; moisture will wick upwards to the rest of the pellets. Either method will encourage roots to grow outward.

Step 4 – Care for it!

As your young seedling emerges from the seed, you’ll notice that it has a set of ‘built-in’ leaves that don’t look a lot like pointy cannabis leaves. These are the cotyledons, and they are there to help the young seedling bootstrap the photosynthesis process. Young seedlings need light right away – but not too bright for the first few days

Keep the peat pellet moist until the seedling is ready to plant in a growing medium, but never saturate the pellet since that can drown the young plant. Add water from the bottom up by dipping the pellet quickly in water. This will promote rapid root growth as the roots will grow down after the water.

When is it time to plant the seedlings?
You’ll know when it’s time because roots will be bursting out of the bottom of the peat pellet. Plant the pellet in a solo cup sized container using a quality soil mix. Water without nutrients for the first few weeks.

Optimizations & Alternatives

Germination Heat Mats

Germination heat mats are just like heating pads, but they don’t get as hot and are water resistant. These are especially useful for germinating seeds in colder conditions.

Germination Enclosures

One of the best ways to simulate tropical climates is to use an enclosure to conserve moisture and heat. You can make your own from cheap plastic containers, or buy a special purpose kit made for peat pellets. Used along with a germination heat mat, you can easily set up a tropical jungle climate anywhere.

If you want professional results with no hassle and complete stealth, try a professional grow-box.

Can I germinate seeds in paper towels?

Yes, you can germinate marijuana seeds in moist paper towels. Just put a damp paper towel down on a plate or other container and spread the seeds around. Add another damp paper towel or fold over the existing towel to cover all the seeds. You will need to keep the paper towels damp at all times throughout the germination process – a spray bottle can really come in handy for that. Covering the seeds with another plate or plastic will prevent it from drying out too quickly, just make sure that there is still some airflow for when the seedling emerges.

After a few days, the seed will crack and the embryonic cannabis plant will start to emerge. Once you see a solid root begin to emerge, you will need to transplant it into your growing medium. While this approach might be slightly faster than the other methods we’ve shown here, we don’t use this method because of the risk to the plant and main root during transplanting.

Can I germinate seeds directly in the growing medium?

That’s how it works in nature and it’s easy to do. Use a solo cup sized container filled with soil or coco and place the seeds about 3/4 inch (~ 2cm) deep. Keep the medium moist but not wet until you see the seedlings emerge between 3 and seven days later. The reason we recommend peat moss over directly planting in soil is that it is easier to control moisture levels in peat plugs due to the texture and qualities of peat. Experienced growers often sew directly into the growing medium.

Many farmers use rock wool cubes for starting clones and germination, particularly hydroponic growers. While these work well and are economical, they come with drawbacks. We recommend that new growers begin with peat pellets.

How long does it take to germinate?

From the time that you place your seed into the germination medium, you should start to see the emerging seedling within 2-5 days. Cannabis seeds germinate faster when they are kept at the correct temperatures, between 70°F-80°F (21°C-26°C), with a 60-80% relative humidity. Cooler temperatures will slow the germination process or stop it altogether. Germination is usually complete, and the plant is a young seedling within seven days. If you warm the seedlings with a heat mat, they can emerge in as little as 24 hours.

Should I germinate with nutrients?

Germinating plants don’t need any nutrients; it can burn their new leaves and roots. That’s why it’s best to grow seeds in an inert medium, like peat moss pellets or a paper towel. Young seedlings don’t need nutrients until they are a few weeks old.

Do cannabis seeds need light to germinate?

Not really, but they need light within the first day or so of emerging from the seeds, so it’s a good idea to germinate with a light source. Light sources also help increase the temperature, helping the germination process. Sunlight, fluorescent or low powered LED grow lights are all great options.

What if the seed gets stuck on the seedling?

They usually loosen and come off after a day or two. If it doesn’t come off, you can try to separate them. The easiest method is to find the direction of the crack and use a pair of tweezers to ‘help’ the seed continue cracking. Be careful that you don’t clamp the seed down or you can clip the folded embryonic leaves.

Next up, read our seedling care guide to learn how to care for your new seedling.

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