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how much thc is in cbd oil

CBD oil must contain less than 0.3% THC to be considered federally legal, though there is still confusion over this in many parts of the country. From there, state and local laws must also be taken into account – check your local statutes to understand whether CBD oil is truly legal in your neck of the woods.

It’s important to note that while cannabis can contain both THC and CBD in high amounts, the plant’s genetics typically predispose it toward one or the other. In other words, cannabis plants that are bred specifically for THC potency will naturally have much lower CBD content, and vice versa.

Due to its psychoactive properties, THC has historically been considered a sort of superstar of cannabinoids. The booming market for medicinal and recreational marijuana places it at the forefront, with growers producing record-breaking strains of up to 40% THC.

So, How Much THC is in CBD Oil?

One of the more common inquiries heard is “how much THC is in CBD oil?” The answer varies depending on a variety of factors. Although research indicates that a full-spectrum extract – whereupon both THC and CBD are present amongst a host of other cannabinoids – is the most effective form of CBD, the difference in legal status between CBD and THC causes concern for some consumers. For example, some worry that an excess of THC in CBD oil may lead to a failed drug screen.

To appease consumers in both markets, dispensaries in states like Colorado now stock tinctures of varying CBD-to-THC ratios, from 18:1 to 4:1 to 1:1. This provides buyers who benefit from both CBD and THC to have the best of both worlds and find a product tailored to their individual needs.

Although the cannabis plant produces over 100 distinct cannabinoids, two of them – THC and CBD – garner the most attention. They also make up the vast majority of cannabis’ cannabinoid content, with others like CBG and CBC being present in much smaller amounts.

Because industrial hemp naturally contains very little THC (0.3% or less), it remains the sole (legal) option for CBD production in any state without recreational or medical marijuana laws. This is a substantial bottleneck for CBD production in these states, for allowing a higher level of THC would naturally result in higher CBD levels and make the extraction process much more efficient.

The short answer is, yes, it’s possible to consume CBD products that have trace amounts of THC, but you may not notice. Understanding why, and how to avoid it, requires a basic knowledge of what CBD is, how it’s extracted, and how it works in your body. Get ready to read some labels.

While there isn’t necessarily a guarantee that the trace amounts of THC in CBD oil won’t show up on a drug test, you really don’t need to worry about it. If you want to be completely sure that your CBD oil won’t result in a positive drug test, seek out raw CBD oil, CBD distillate, or other pure CBD products.

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If you consume CBD oil or other CBD products, will you run the risk of ingesting THC?

The second-most-prominent cannabinoid of the cannabis plant, cannabidiol (CBD) has become valued in recent years for being non-intoxicating — as opposed to intoxicating tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the cannabinoid responsible for the cannabis “high” — while also offering a variety of potential health benefits. Many consumers who take CBD oil say they do so because they want the medicinal benefits associated with cannabis without the effects of THC.

In the earlier days of CBD product manufacturing, full-spectrum products were likely to contain higher levels of THC than 0.3%. But as the industry has matured, it’s now possible to find full-spectrum hemp products with all of the cannabinoids and terpenes found in hemp but no more than 0.3% THC. Just be sure the label says full-spectrum hemp, not marijuana.