Posted on

does cbd oil show up in a drug test

Broad-spectrum CBD is also less likely to be contaminated with THC. This is because all the THC is removed in broad-spectrum CBD as opposed to full-spectrum CBD which contains all of the compounds that naturally occur in the plant they were extracted from. CBD isolate is also pure CBD, and typically comes from hemp so it shouldn’t contain THC.

If you want to pass a drug test, don't take CBD; or if you are taking it legally within your State's laws, then declare it (however it still may be contaminated with THC unless brought by a reputable supplier who guarantees it to be THC-free).

Official Answer

It is difficult to say how much THC needs to be present to cause a positive drug test because this depends on several drug and patient-specific variables, and also the cutoff value for the test.

Medically reviewed by Carmen Fookes, BPharm. Last updated on Oct 30, 2019.

An estimate of the length of time marijuana (THC) is detectable in urine is:

The conclusion is that it’s still theoretically possible for traces of THC metabolites to be present in the stomach acid in the instance where “less-purified CBD productions” are ingested.

There are several common reasons a person fails a CBD drug test.

What are the odds that CBD oil users will test positive when subjected to illicit drug screenings, and what can be done to prevent it?

How to Avoid a Positive CBD Drug Test

CBD oil extracted from hemp is not supposed to have any more than .3 percent of THC. However, it’s not uncommon for sellers to mislabel their products as THC-free hemp when in reality, it’s a low-quality oil extracted from marijuana, which does contain THC.

As it turns out, depending on the source of the cannabis that is used to produce the CBD oil, some products do contain traces of THC (including low-quality isolates and many full-spectrum tinctures).

The primary difference between hemp and marijuana is that hemp is nearly void of THC. In fact, a cannabis strain must contain less than .3 percent THC to be classified as hemp. This is the reason hemp can be legally sold as various products.

While some CBD oils claim to be isolates, they may be full spectrum oils and actually contain more cannabinoids (such as THC) than they claim.

Cannabidiol (CBD) has recently surged into the therapeutic spotlight for its perceived anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, pain-relieving, and seizure-suppressing properties. CBD products can be found in health and wellness aisles across the world — perhaps even at your local Walgreens or CVS — in many forms, some of which include CBD oil, tinctures, edibles, elixirs, and more.

If drug testing is a concern but you still want to consume CBD for any of its reported health benefits, you absolutely can. Follow the instructions below based on your preferred consumption method and choose CBD products accordingly.

How to consume CBD without THC

Recognized as the preferred method for cannabis drug testing, urine screenings are often used as a benchmark to detect for cannabis use. Most urine tests utilize a specific sensitivity for the cutoff concentration of THC-COOH. The most common cutoff concentration point is 50 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL), as suggested by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Whichever method, or methods, you choose, be sure to buy from a reputable source and check the label carefully. Since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasn’t established guidelines for CBD products, it’s buyer beware. Avoid any product making health claims like that it cures or treats anything specific. Most reputable CBD producers typically include the following information on their product labels:

If you’re vaping or dabbing your CBD, it’s the same advice as above — look for concentrates made with isolate or crystalline to avoid THC completely. (If you smoke or vape flower, you’ll be consuming whatever level of THC is present in the bud, which is at least 0.3% even for hemp plants.)