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does cbd oil interact with any medications

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A total of 380 drugs are known to interact with cannabis categorized as 26 major, 354 moderate, and 0 minor interactions.

Drug Status

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

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“Herbal products are drugs,” says Rita Alloway, Pharm.D. , research professor of nephrology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. “Just because [something] is herbal … doesn’t mean it can’t interact with any of the pharmaceutically manufactured drugs that you may be taking.”

But claims that CBD aids in the treatment of certain mental health and psychiatric conditions, don’t pass muster, says Roger McIntyre, MD , professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto.

Is CBD marijuana?

Dr. McIntrye, who co-authored a 2018 study that concluded that healthcare providers need more information about drug-drug interactions with CBD and psychotropic medication, says much of the information out there is confusing and contradictory. Therefore, he echoes Dr. Alloway’s statement that it is absolutely prudent that patients clear the use of CBD with their doctor before giving it a go.

While CBD is one of the active ingredients in marijuana, using CBD itself will not get you high (the component that does that is called tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC). CBD is really just a molecule within the hemp variety of the cannabis plant, and there is at least some anecdotal evidence and preliminary research suggesting that the extraction created from this molecule has some health benefits.

Despite the not-so-great news about CBD for patients using tacrolimus, for some people, CBD is actually life-changing in a positive way. In 2018, for example, the CBD-derived medication Epidiolex received FDA approval for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, two very rare and very severe forms of epilepsy.

Some medications changed by the liver include testosterone, progesterone (Endometrin, Prometrium), nifedipine (Adalat CC, Procardia XL), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Glucuronidated drugs) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of these medications.
Some of these medications changed by the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and oxazepam (Serax), haloperidol (Haldol), lamotrigine (Lamictal), morphine (MS Contin, Roxanol), zidovudine (AZT, Retrovir), and others. Medications that decrease the breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) inhibitors) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might increase the effects and side effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might decrease the breakdown cannabidiol in the liver include cimetidine (Tagamet), fluvoxamine (Luvox), omeprazole (Prilosec); ticlopidine (Ticlid), topiramate (Topamax), and others. Medications that decrease the breakdown of other medications in the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibitors) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might increase the effects and side effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol include amiodarone (Cordarone), clarithromycin (Biaxin), diltiazem (Cardizem), erythromycin (E-mycin, Erythrocin), indinavir (Crixivan), ritonavir (Norvir), saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase), and many others. Medications that increase breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inducers) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might increase how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might decrease the effects of cannabidiol.
Some of these medicines include carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), rifampin, rifabutin (Mycobutin), and others. Medications that increase the breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) inducers) Cannabidiol is broken down by the liver. Some medications might increase how quickly the liver breaks down cannabidiol. Taking cannabidiol along with these medications might decrease the effects of cannabidiol.
Some medications that might increase the breakdown of cannabidiol in the liver include carbamazepine (Tegretol), prednisone (Deltasone), and rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane). Methadone (Dolophine) Methadone is broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down methadone. Taking cannabidiol along with methadone might increase the effects and side effects of methadone. Rufinamide (Banzel) Rufinamide is changed and broken down by the body. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the body breaks down rufinamide. This might increase levels of rufinamide in the body by a small amount. Sedative medications (CNS depressants) Cannabidiol might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking cannabidiol along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Some medications changed by the liver include alprazolam (Xanax), amlodipine (Norvasc), clarithromycin (Biaxin), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), erythromycin, lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin) and many others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), omeprazole (Prilosec, Omesec), clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo), progesterone (Prometrium, others), lansoprazole (Prevacid), flutamide (Eulexin), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), erlotinib (Tarceva), and caffeine. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Special precautions & warnings:

Some medications changed by the liver include ketamine (Ketalar), phenobarbital, orphenadrine (Norflex), secobarbital (Seconal), and dexamethasone (Decadron). Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Cannabidiol is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Cannabidiol products can be contaminated with other ingredients that may be harmful to the fetus or infant. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Some medications changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), flecainide (Tambocor), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), ondansetron (Zofran), paroxetine (Paxil), risperidone (Risperdal), tramadol (Ultram), venlafaxine (Effexor), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), piroxicam (Feldene), and celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.