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cbd oil overdose dogs

Medical cannabis is relatively new in Australia, and a lot of pet owners are searching for safe CBD oil, but what happens if you give your dog too much CBD oil?

Even though there is no immediate threat to a dog’s life if they have taken too much CBD oil, they may show side effects that include:

Dogs who have taken too much CBD oil may have adverse effects, but there have been no records of overdosing. Similarly to humans, if dogs take too much CBD oil, they will not overdose. Always discuss the use of CBD oil when treating your dog with your veterinarian, as your dog may have side effects.

Cannabis, otherwise known as marijuana or hemp, is a legal medicine in Australia. CBD oil is an extract of the cannabis plant and is non-intoxicating.

In some cases, raw marijuana has been known to poison animals. It is important to only medicate your dog with prescription medicine from your veterinarian.

CBD, or cannabidiol, is a compound found in cannabis and hemp. Dr. Klein says it is essential to note that in most cases, CBD oil does not contain delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the compound that gives marijuana its psychoactive properties. In fact, most CBD products are derived from hemp and not from marijuana.

Learn more about the CBD study funded by the Canine Health Foundation.

How Does CBD Affect Dogs?

While there’s no scientific data on the side effects of CBD usage for dogs, there are potential side effects based on how CBD affects humans. To minimize any potential side effects, make sure you are following the proper dosage.

If you and your veterinarian decide that you should try CBD as a treatment for your dog, there are a few things to keep in mind when purchasing CBD oil. Not all oils are the same; you’ll want high-quality CBD oil to have a better chance of it working.

According to Dr. Klein, CBD is also used because of its anti-inflammatory properties, cardiac benefits, anti-nausea effects, appetite stimulation, anti-anxiety impact, and for possible anti-cancer benefits, although there’s no conclusive data on this use.

A: No; however, there are several possible reasons a dog who has ingested CBD may look high:

A: CBD is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 and has the potential to affect the metabolism of other drugs. While this appears to be of minimal clinical significance in most cases, this may be important when CBD is used in a pet for seizure control. Doses of other anticonvulsants may need to be adjusted. Remember that owners may discontinue anticonvulsants on their own if they feel that CBD is controlling their pet’s seizures, so this is an important discussion to have.

A: Most cases need no treatment, aside from symptomatic care for gastrointestinal upset if it occurs. If it’s a large dose, where the THC content might be a factor, mild sedation, urinary incontinence, hyperesthesia, and ataxia could develop, and the pet should be confined to prevent injury from misadventure. If you see significant signs that look like THC toxicity, treat the pet in front of you and provide IV fluid support, anti-nausea medication, and good nursing care as needed.

A: Products sold as “soft chews” can have an osmotic effect when large amounts of chews are ingested and pull fluid from the body into the gastrointestinal tract. In mild cases, this can lead to diarrhea and dehydration. In severe cases, hypernatremia, hyperglycemia, hyperkalemia, azotemia, and acidosis can occur. Aggressive fluid therapy, while monitoring hydration status and electrolytes in these pets, is critical.

A: Vomiting, lethargy, inappetence, and diarrhea are the most common clinical signs reported. Ataxia can occasionally occur with large ingestions.