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cbd oil nc

It’s essential that you do your research about the products you purchase. The Food and Drug Administration has found that many of the products sold over the counter have significantly less CBD than advertised.

North Carolina has been slow to make progress when it comes to marijuana laws. Although medical marijuana licenses are available, they only apply to epilepsy patients, and you need to travel to another state to make your purchases.

How to Protect Yourself from Low-Quality CBD Oil Companies

According to the Federal Government, marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug, which means it has the following qualities:

A large reason for this is that the Federal Controlled Substances Act classes marijuana as a prohibited drug.

On the other hand, CBD oil produced from industrial hemp is legal to buy and possess in all 50 states. This is a product of the Farm Bill of 2014, which took industrial hemp off of the federal list of controlled substances.

While North Carolina is far from being a paradise for cannabis enthusiasts, the CBD oil market is growing strong, with more shops popping up in the most important cities.

As we speak, marijuana for recreational purposes remains illegal in North Carolina. However, even for a zero-tolerance state, North Carolina managed to show some human kindness in 2014 by passing House Bill 1220 – also known as the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act. The bill grants some children the right to use a hemp extract with THC levels under 0.9%, and CBD levels of at least 5%, for untreatable epilepsy to help control their illness and reduce symptoms.

BUYING CBD OIL ONLINE IN NORTH CAROLINA

Like we said, to find the best CBD oil in North California, you will need to do the research.

If you’re a natural-born researcher, we suggest that you shop for CBD oil online. As we said, many decent manufacturers ship their products to North Carolina, so obtaining CBD oil through their websites may be the quickest and easiest way to do so.

Nonetheless, let us not forget that since 2014, all states have been granted the right to cultivate and research the industrial hemp variety of the cannabis plant. This, in turn, means that hemp-derived CBD oil is widely available in North Carolina, regardless of its harsh laws on both the medical and recreational use of marijuana.

Broad-spectrum means that the product contains CBD and terpenes, but has undergone additional processes to strip out any THC.

The Farm Bill also shifted oversight of hemp-derived products to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), giving the agency the ability to regulate CBD’s labeling, therapeutic claims, and its use as a food additive. Despite the passage of the Farm Bill, the FDA has taken the stance that even hemp-derived CBD may not be added to food and beverages, nor can this non-intoxicating cannabinoid be marketed as a dietary supplement.

The federal legislation still highly regulates the production and sale of hemp and its cannabinoids, including CBD. The Farm Bill also provides that states may also regulate and even prohibit CBD cultivation and commerce. In addition, states may attempt to regulate CBD foods, beverages, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products, independently of the FDA finalizing its views on such products.

How to read CBD labels and packaging

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

One of the most important things to pay attention to is whether a CBD product is full-spectrum, broad-spectrum, or isolate.

There’s no possession limit for CBD products in North Carolina or for medical patients with epilepsy who have registered with the state. Medical hemp extract must contain less than 0.9% THC and at least 5% CBD by weight.

North Carolina permitted the cultivation and production of hemp under the Industrial Hemp Pilot Program, authorized in 2014. The following year the North Carolina General Assembly passed Senate Bill 313, allowing the Industrial Hemp Commission to create rules and a licensing structure to stay within federal regulations. The law was modified again in 2016 with House Bill 992, which authorized a research program related to hemp.