Posted on

cbd oil mississippi

Now, cannabidiol can be derived either from hemp or marijuana. Since marijuana is not legal in the state, if you want to use CBD products, it’s wise to know all the rules and laws regarding buying CBD oil in Mississippi.

For those who don’t feel confident enough to visit local stores to find a high-quality CBD oil, consider ordering one online. When buying CBD oil online, you’re getting access to an abundance of manufacturers and retailers available on the Internet.

Where to Buy CBD Oil in Mississippi?

Now, since all hemp products are legal throughout all 50 states, there are many online retailers you can order your desired product from.

Although Mississippi has very hostile laws regarding marijuana, you can still legally buy hemp-based products. In fact, cannabidiol is becoming more and more popular across the States, and good retailers are popping up on the streets like crazy these days. Thus, if you want to get CBD oil, you can either visit a local store or order your favorite cannabidiol product online.

Here is everything you need to know before adding a product to your shopping cart:

All of these stores should be able to answer your CBD questions. If you don’t see your city on our list, your best bet is to ask down at your local vape store.

This is because marijuana is still treated as a Schedule 1 drug under the Federal Controlled Substances Act.

Although marijuana possession has harsh penalties in Mississippi, you may be able to access marijuana-derived CBD products through the University of Mississippi if you have severe epilepsy.

Southaven

Otherwise, there are always quality industrial hemp CBD products available online.

Now, hopefully, this doesn’t apply to any of you, but I thought it’s a good indicator of how Mississippi treats marijuana.

CBD is used to treat symptoms such as:

Your second offense will get you a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 60 days in jail and a fine of $250 to $500. Repeat offenses cause fines and jail time to rise.

HB 1547 also established the Mississippi Hemp Cultivation Task Force. This team, led by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce, was tasked with undertaking a comprehensive study of hemp’s potential costs and benefits. This clause of the law has a sunset date of July 1, 2020, so the team is expected to make recommendations by this time.

The 2018 Farm Bill shifted the oversight of hemp and hemp-derived products from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA does not presently allow CBD-infused food, drinks, or dietary supplements to be sold, and hasn’t yet provided regulations for hemp-derived CBD products.

Possession of any amount of CBD with more than 2.5 milligrams of THC per milliliter is punishable by Mississippi law. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Licensing requirements for CBD

In 2017, lawmakers passed SB 2610, which allowed the use of CBD in the research of treatment of seizures and other medical conditions but did not legalize it more broadly.

The 2018 Farm Bill legislation does not mean that CBD derived from hemp is universally legal throughout the United States. According to the Farm Bill, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the power to regulate CBD product labeling, including therapeutic claims and the use of CBD as a food additive.

The FDA has declared that even hemp-derived CBD may not legally be added to food and beverages, or marketed as a dietary supplement. Although the organization has begun to re-evaluate some of its stances on legal CBD products, the FDA has not revised its regulations. The agency also has been strict in its position against any labeling that could be perceived as a medical claim about CBD.

The 2018 Farm Bill re-classified hemp as an agricultural commodity and made its cultivation federally legal. Further, the act removed some forms of cannabis from Schedule 1 status by creating a legal distinction between hemp and marijuana. Hemp is cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, and marijuana refers to cannabis with more than 0.3% THC. This distinction in federal law effectively legalized CBD that is derived from cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, as long as it has been cultivated according to federal and state regulations.