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cbd oil for dogs for thunderstorms

The reason why CBD oil is so beneficial for the body has to do with the endocannabinoid system. All mammals—people and dogs included—have endocannabinoid systems comprised of interconnected cannabinoid receptors These receptors are in charge of relaying important information about what’s going on in the body to trigger the appropriate immune response. It’s the body’s command center for health and healing.

Not every dog is afraid of thunderstorms, but for those that are, it’s seriously scary. Many dogs have noise sensitivities, and storms aren’t the only triggers. Fireworks, loud music, construction sounds, and anything else above a normal volume can put them on edge.

RELATED: Which brand of CBD Oil Does iHeartDogs Recommend as Safe and Effective?

At its root, a dog’s fear response to noise is all about anxiety. Loud noises make them feel emotionally distressed, wary, and like they have no control over what’s happening. The brain releases a cocktail of stress hormones that are more powerful than all your comforting words and soothing pets could ever be.

There are few things more terrifying to a dog than a thunderstorm. There are also few things more frustrating to a loving owner than trying to make their terrified pup feel calm.

CBD oil comes into play because, as a cannabinoid, it can bond with these receptors to allow better communication. It tells the system what kind of immune response is needed, and it’s a completely natural way for the body to bring itself back into balance.

You can administer a few drops of CBD oil (follow the instructions for the recommended dose) directly into their mouth. But some dogs can be a little mouthy and mixing it in with a bit of food may be easier on both you and your dog. Note that it may take an extra 15- 30 minutes for the CBD to take effect if they ingest it rather than take it sublingually.

We made up a complete serving size guide for CBD oil so you can find the right amount of CBD to give to your pet.

Though CBD functions in a similar way in dogs as it does in humans, dogs are more sensitive to CBD. That means you have to give them smaller doses than you would take yourself.

The Method

If you notice your dog displaying any of these behaviors during a storm, they might be suffering from anxiety.

Once your dog is stimulated and full of adrenalin, it can be hard to stop them from chewing, scratching, or damaging your home. And it can be even harder to watch them deal with their anxiety alone.

So let’s take a closer look at the dose size and the treatment methods below.

The exact dose size for your dog will depend on what type of CBD you give them. It’s a good idea to stick to CBD products design for pets.

Today, countless dogs are given anxiety meds like canine Prozac to help ease thunderstorm anxiety. In this blog, we’re going to discuss the association between pain and anxiety , and discuss how cannabidiol for dogs may be beneficial in helping with pain and anxiety in dogs.

Professor Daniel Mills from the University of Lincoln’s School of Life Sciences explains that they believe that undiagnosed pain could be exacerbated when dogs react to a noise that makes a dog tense up putting extra stress on inflamed muscles and joints, causing more pain.

Why Are Dogs Scared of Thunder Storms?

As many as 40% of dogs suffer from noise anxiety with it becoming worse during the summer. Dogs that are anxious will display excessive fear, pacing, drooling, panic, and will also have an increased heart rate. CBD research has demonstrated that CBD hemp oil supplements may be effective for pets suffering from anxiety. Dogs that suffer from storm phobia may do the following:

The researchers explain that the “pain is then associated with a loud or startling noise, leading to a sensitivity to noise and avoidance of situations where they had previously had a bad experience — for example a local park, or a louder room in the house.”

A 2018 study on dogs with noise sensitivity adds that “ Dogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, according to new research.