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cbd oil and asthma

Although CBD isn’t a cure for asthma, it can effectively help in the management of its symptoms. The science behind these effects is pretty simple but requires some elaboration. Let’s have a look at the most vivid benefits of CBD for asthma.

Let’s shed more light on it!

CBD Oil vs Inflammation

Inflammation in the lungs is the main trigger of asthma flare-ups. When a patient gets exposed to irritants, such as allergens, the immune system brings an inflammatory response.

Although no studies have been performed specifically on the use of CBD for asthma, there is evidence that CBD has a bronchodilatory effect, which can help relax the lungs and ease muscle spasms. Taking full-spectrum CBD oil may result in improved lung function and easier breathing.

Capsules and edibles are good if you want to use CBD for prevention. However, if you need immediate relief from your symptoms, they are not the best option out there.

With a fundamental lack of research into how CBD oil affects people with asthma, many medical experts remain on the fence about the treatment’s benefits and drawbacks.

Finally, there may be some therapeutic value in full-spectrum oil, which does contain the intoxicating cannabinoid THC as well as CBD. A 2016 literature review published in the “Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology” found that THC may help suppress the immune system. In some types of asthma, the immune system overreacts to an environmental trigger, resulting in bothersome symptoms. The findings of this study could be especially beneficial for those who suffer from allergic asthma. Researchers in this study also noted that the cannabinoid system plays an important role in balancing immunity.

Wheezing, coughing, and labored breathing are just a few of the disruptive effects of asthma. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Miceli’s experience with CBD oil has been so positive that he has considered canceling his upcoming surgery to repair a deviated septum. He said, “If the results continue like this, then I would love to skip the surgery.”

Asthma is a condition that most sufferers learn to manage over time, through lifestyle and environmental changes as well as prescription maintenance medication and rescue inhalers for asthma attacks. Nick Foster is an author and blogger who writes about methods for controlling asthma. On his blog Treating Asthma at Home, Foster writes that his asthma was mostly controlled by diet and exercise, but he still felt symptoms and discomfort occasionally so he decided to try CBD. After taking 20 milligrams a day sublingually or orally, he blogged about the results. “I’ve been taking CBD for about a year now, and I still haven’t had to sit through any discomfort or other asthmatic symptoms, let alone use my rescue inhaler,” Foster said.

If you or someone you love has asthma then you know how debilitating the symptoms can be. Wheezing, coughing, and labored breathing are just a few of the disruptive effects of this chronic lung disease that affects 25 million Americans. Smoking cannabis might not be the best idea for someone with lung disease, but what about using CBD oil to treat asthma?

The lowered levels of anxiety Miceli credits to CBD oil do not come as a surprise to anyone familiar with the benefits of medical marijuana. In fact, cannabis has been emerging as an alternative to anxiety medications and some top physicians are recognizing the potential.

Here we’ll go over the current research on CBD and its role in asthma. We discuss how to use CBD effectively, and what you can do to maximize the benefits.

Asthma is an inflammatory immune condition — something CBD is particularly well-suited for. Learn how to use CBD products for asthma, and what to avoid.

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Asthma symptoms appear less than two days per week and don’t interrupt daily activities. This level usually involves short-lived flare-ups and rarely involves nighttime symptoms.

Asthma attacks are temporary periods of increased symptoms. In most cases, something triggered the attack — such as dust, cigarette smoke, exercise, or food allergies.

There are many different causes for asthma, but the underlying cause of symptoms remains much the same — inflammation and excess mucus production in the airway leading down to the lungs.