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cbd hemp oil facts

Because full spectrum CBD oil interacts with cannabinoid receptors in the brain, it’s not entirely accurate to describe it as non-psychoactive. However, it will not induce the sense of euphoria for which it’s cousin, THC, is so well-known.

At the time of this writing, only one cannabis-derived product has been approved by the FDA: Epidiolex, a drug containing CBD, is administered to patients two years of age and older as a treatment for seizures. The FDA currently prohibits the marketing of any CBD product as a treatment for any disease or condition and emphasizes that some manufacturers of CBD products are not abiding by FDA standards and are potentially putting consumers at risk.

CBD Doesn’t Get You High

While CBD in of itself has several purported benefits, it works best in conjunction with the many other cannabinoids present in cannabis. This concept is known as the entourage effect and is the reasoning behind the popularity of full-spectrum CBD oil over most other CBD products. It is for this reason that NuLeaf Naturals sells only full spectrum CBD oil.

Though much is already known about CBD and its effects, much remains to be discovered. There is an ongoing global shift in attitudes regarding how CBD is viewed both as a drug and a consumer commodity, whereupon continued scientific study is shedding more light on its therapeutic potential while discrediting the negative stigmas of the past.

CBD is a negative allosteric modulator of CB1, the cannabinoid receptor to which THC directly binds. This reduces THC’s binding affinity to that receptor, thereby diminishing some of the effects of THC. Studies have demonstrated that users report feeling less anxious and less euphoric overall when administered a combination of CBD and THC as opposed to THC alone.

CBD oil may reduce the risk of heart disease by alleviating hypertension (high blood pressure) in certain people, suggests a 2017 study in JCI Insight.  

For this study, nine healthy men took either 600 mg of CBD or the same dose of a placebo. According to the researcher, those treated with CBD had lower blood pressure before and after exposure to stressful stimuli (including exercise or extreme cold).

Heart Health

Meredith Bull, ND, is a licensed naturopathic doctor with a private practice in Los Angeles. She helped co-author the first integrative geriatrics textbook, "Integrative Geriatric Medicine."

Since some CBD oils contain trace amounts of THC, you should avoid driving or using heavy machinery when taking CBD oil, particularly when first starting treatment or using a new brand.

According to a 2017 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, only 30.95% of CBD products sold online were correctly labeled. Most contained less CBD than advertised, while 21.43% had significant amounts of THC.

According to a 2019 survey from Gallup, 1 in 7 Americans, or 14%, use some form of CBD, mostly for medicinal purposes. As CBD’s presence continues to grow, consumers and patients are becoming more curious about the ins and outs of this therapeutic cannabis derivative.

So, if we’re unable to figure out what dose is most effective for treating most ailments, where does that leave the user who doesn’t have experience with CBD? Fortunately, it’s easy to simply start with small doses and slowly work toward higher ones. Why? Because a 2011 study and a 2017 update show that CBD has what clinicians call a ‘favorable safety profile,’ due to the fact that it doesn’t change major factors like heart rate, blood pressure, or body temperature and it doesn’t affect psychological functions. It’s also been proven that doses of up to 1,500 milligrams per day are well tolerated, even over long periods of time. However, some subjects from several CBD-related studies have reported side effects of CBD use, including extreme sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, convulsions, and vomiting. There is also evidence that CBD can interfere with certain prescription medications so it’s best to check with a doctor or pharmacist before mixing oral CBD and prescription drugs.

1. CBD is legal, but only if it's derived from hemp

When it comes to finding the most effective CBD dosage for a specific condition, there is no exact measurement or universal guideline that works for everyone. Part of the reason may have to do with the fact that genetic mutations of our cannabinoid receptors cause variances in the way a body reacts to CBD. If you, for example, are walking around with a different CB1 receptor variation than your friend, the two of you may react differently to the same dose of CBD. In other words, an effective CBD dose for one patient may not work for another. There are several other factors that determine the effectiveness of a CBD dose, including the product itself, the method of consumption, as well as the patient or consumer’s physiology.

One of the major CBD selling points to come out of the compound’s recent product boom is that the cannabinoid is both therapeutic and “non-psychoactive,” as opposed to the extraordinarily psychoactive THC. While you might commonly read this “fact” about CBD, it isn’t accurate to say that CBD is devoid of any psychoactive effects.

Those who have had limited experience shopping for CBD oil may wonder where to start, or how to find a quality product. Firstly, understand that marijuana and industrial hemp are both common CBD oil sources. There are also several types and formulas on the market, which typically fall into one of three categories: