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cannabidiol and sleep disorders

Don’t go above 10 milligrams. A larger amount might raise your odds of poor sleep. “We don’t know if (THC) is disrupting sleep architecture at those higher doses,” Sexton says.

But some studies show promise. That includes a small one on dronabinol, a human-made version of medical THC. Early research shows it might help with obstructive sleep apnea. But “at this point, we do not recommend the use of cannabis products for treatment of sleep apnea or other sleep disorders,” Kolla says.

There isn’t an official “dose” that works for everyone. Always read the product label for instructions. Even better, talk to a health care professional before you try THC or CBD. Tell them if you have other health problems or you take any other medication.

Is CBD Safe?

Ask about nondrug ways to get a good night’s rest. “My sleep expert colleagues will always say behavioral treatments are superior to pharmacological treatments,” Vandrey says.

Don’t use cannabis products if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. The drug could affect your baby.

No detail is too small and could help your doctor figure out what’s triggering your sleep issues.

Michelle Sexton, ND, assistant adjunct professor in the department of anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego.

CBD is an increasingly popular substance in the U.S. While many health benefits have been attributed to CBD, in most cases, scientific validity of its effectiveness is still unclear.

Research shows 300-mg oral doses of CBD can be taken safely on a daily basis for up to six months. One scientific review showed that taking up to 1,500 mg daily was well-tolerated by participants. A subsequent review confirmed that use of 1,500 mg daily for four weeks showed no negative effects.

Is CBD FDA-Approved?

CBD, the other commonly known cannabinoid, can be legally sold in the U.S. when extracted from hemp and marketed according to relevant regulations. CBD does not have psychoactive properties and does not bring about the same effects as THC. Also, CBD does not have effects that would lead to potential dependency or risk of abuse.

Cannabis plants and derivatives that contain less than 0.3% THC are classified as “hemp.” As of 2018, hemp is no longer defined as a controlled substance by the U.S. federal government. As a result, there has been an influx of hemp-related products in the American market. These products are generally marketed as CBD products.

Most commonly known effects of cannabis, such as “getting high,” are caused by the cannabinoid, THC. The term “marijuana” specifically refers to parts of the Cannabis sativa plant that contain THC.

Besides addressing the cause behind you or your loved one’s sleep issues, there are other problems to consider regarding the use of CBD.

Hemp-derived CBD is legal in all 50 states. However, state laws vary with regard to the legality of marijuana. CBD oil that still contains THC or other cannabinoids may only be sold in states that have legalized marijuana use.

Other Considerations

A 2017 study found that only 31% of 84 CBD products bought online were labeled accurately for concentration, with 43% having less CBD than stated and 26% having more. In addition, over 21% had detectable THC.  

State Law

Genetics, environmental factors (such as travel, a crying baby, a loud bedroom), medications, or substance abuse may also contribute to poor sleep.