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can you feel cbd oil

I hate to admit this, but I’m a very stress-prone person. I’ve gotta hit several deadlines each day, survive a number of meetings, and juggle a work life, a romantic relationship, and very dear friendships (in other words: I’m like every other person). In the past, though, I’ve let all of this pressure get to me, and could almost feel coritsol surging in my body. However, I found that taking CBD oil regularly has eased this stress (something it’s scientifically proven to do), and I’m able to get through my day without feeling as though the completion of my to-do list is set to the tune of major stress.

As for how it actually makes you feel, it’s more of a subtle effect. “CBD is used and repurposed by your body in the way you need it most, so the feeling by each individual tends to be a bit different,” says Heitman. “However, I think everyone feels relief and balance from daily use of CBD.”

Now, obviously, everyone is different, and it’s important to remember that you should check with your doctor before introducing something new into your regimen. But given its cred, I was ready to give it a go. Here’s what happened when I did.

2. I became less stressed-out

On a related note, I’m also able to focus better when I’m at work. That’s likely due to CBD oil’s proven effects at relieving anxiety, which therefore results in a clear mind that’s better able to cross things off of my to-do list. Before trying out the ingredient, I’ve often felt overly anxious at work when I have a lot going on at once—but taking CBD regularly (and honestly probably wrapping my head around my to-do list in a healthy way) has allowed me to think more rationally about what’s on my plate, rather than sit and freak out about it.

I began taking a full dropper of Feals (around 30 mg of CBD) before I went to bed by holding it under my tongue for 30 seconds—which Todd and most all CBD brands recommend as the fastest way for your body to absorb the ingredient. Within roughly 15 minutes, I felt a comforting, warm sense of calm wash over me that was deeper than when I take melatonin. Over the next half hour or so of watching TV, I became increasingly tired and proceeded to fall fast asleep and woke up feeling rested in a way that some sleep supplements don’t allow me to (which FWIW, a small study has shown). So yes, it’s now a steady part of my nighttime regimen.

After ingesting CBD oil for two weeks straight, I’m now a true believer in the wellness ingredient’s superstar prowess. Its calming effects are so legit, but my fave perk of all is that I get better sleep. Nowadays I’m taking CBD right before I brush my teeth at night, and you know what? I’m now a better-rested, more calm person—who just so happens to be on the CBD train.

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The physical effects of CBD may depend on which type of product you get and how you enjoy it. For example, some people like to rub CBD oil on their aching joints or sore muscles. This is why products like our Zero THC CBD Pain Cream appeal to so many people. Other people say they prefer to buy CBD oil or Zero THC Water Soluble CBD Drops to inspire a sense of wellness throughout the entire body.

Everyone has their own unique body chemistry, which is part of why the experience of hemp-derived CBD is different for everyone. Even though this is a personal experience, you may be able to get some idea of what to expect by listening to others. For example, many of our customers report that they buy these products when they want to feel relaxed, calm, and experience a general sense of physical and mental wellness.

What Does CBD Do?

This question really depends a lot on your body and what you’re trying to get from your relationship with CBD. Some people find that even a very small amount is right for them, while others find that they feel best when with a larger dose of CBD. We recommend that you start with a small amount and gradually enjoy more until you find your sweet spot.

It’s a question we get all the time from first-time shoppers: “what does CBD feel like?” It’s a good question, especially as more and more people start talking about the benefits of CBD. Unfortunately, the answer is a little bit more complicated, and there’s really no simple way to describe what cannabidiol (CBD) will do as far as its interactions with your body.

To help set expectations for how CBD will make you feel, it might help you learn more about what exactly it does as it interacts with your body. CBD interacts with your body’s natural endocannabinoid system, which helps regulate all kinds of different bodily functions. The endocannabinoid system is at work in relation to all of the following:

The ECS spans the entire body. It’s considered to be one of the most important and complex networks, alongside the Central Nervous System (CNS) and Immune System. The receptors that make up the ECS have even been found within the CNS and Immune System and are now known to regulate mood, pain, inflammation, appetite, coordination among many, many other functions./p>

You may have heard anecdotes from friends about the benefits bringing this natural supplement into your life has to offer. But, while fascinating to learn about, you may feel as though none of this has clearly told you how CBD will make you feel. We’re here to fill you in.

Is CBD addictive?

Until we know more, it’s best to err on the side of caution. And of course, always consult a medical professional for their expert advice.

The impact CBD has on the human body is, given the way we are mostly all made the same inside, similar for many people. However, the dosage you take, the strain of hemp used in the product, how/where the product is grown, extraction and other ingredients included, not to mention the reason you have chosen to take CBD in the first place, all make for unique experiences.

One week-long 2013 study published in the Addictive Behaviours journal found that participants given a CBD inhaler to use every time they felt the need to smoke reduced their number of cigarettes by 40%, while those with the placebo showed no notable difference.