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can cbd oil show up on drug test

It is difficult to say how much THC needs to be present to cause a positive drug test because this depends on several drug and patient-specific variables, and also the cutoff value for the test.

This is more likely to happen if the CBD you are buying is marijuana-derived CBD rather than hemp-derived CBD. Hemp-derived CBD is required by law to contain less than 0.3% THC, although regular daily ingestion of high doses of this may still cause THC to accumulate.

Official Answer

Medically reviewed by Carmen Fookes, BPharm. Last updated on Oct 30, 2019.

The following variables affect the amount of time that marijuana (THC) and its metabolites remain detectable in the urine or other biological samples:

Federal workplace cutoff values for marijuana metabolites are 50 ng/mL for immunoassay screening tests (one ng is a billionth of a gram). In a confirmatory test, a metabolite of marijuana is measured, called delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, and a positive test result is above 15 ng/mL. However, this can vary depending on the variables listed above and should not be relied upon to ensure a drug-free result.

Using a CBD product containing THC is the most common reason why you’d fail a CBD drug test. In some cases, this might be because you buy a low-quality product that contains a trace amount of THC. Many manufacturers do claim their products don’t have THC in them when they really do.

There are certain things you can do if you use a CBD product to prevent you from failing a drug test. These include:

How Does Drug Testing For Cannabis Work?

There are a few reasons why you’d fail a CBD drug test.

CBD oil and other CBD products can be made from either the cannabis plant or the hemp plant. These are closely related variations of Cannabis sativa. Products with CBD in them contain cannabidiol, which is a cannabinoid, and doesn’t make you high. It’s the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in marijuana that causes the buzz you experience.

In rare cases, a false positive test could occur from CBD oil breaking down in small amounts of THC in your stomach. It’s theoretically possible for you to have traces of THC metabolites in your stomach acid when you ingest “less-purified CBD productions.”

Topical products that claim to contain CBD—like shampoos, cosmetics or creams—should not cause any reaction during a drug test because they do not enter the bloodstream. In the case of CBD oils, gummies, teas or transdermal patches, the situation is more complicated. In a test of 84 CBD products obtained online, 18 contained THC.

If you are concerned that THC in your CBD oil or other CBD product may show up on a drug test, you may be able to reduce the chance of that occurring, though there is no guarantee. Some of the factors that may increase the likelihood of a failed drug test are:

Factors in CBD Oil Showing on Drug Screen

THC can be detected in a urine test for up to 15 days, depending on how often and how much you use. It leaves the bloodstream in about five hours, but substances your body makes from THC (THC metabolites) can show up for as long as 7 days. CBD tends to stay in the bloodstream from 2 to 5 days, depending on dosage and frequency. If you have been using CBD for a while, it can stay in your body for up to 30 days or more.

CBD has taken off as a natural remedy for a variety of ailments. CBD products like CBD oil can be made from either the hemp plant or the cannabis plant, which are closely related varieties of the same cannabis species, Cannabis sativa. CBD products contain a cannabinoid—a chemical—called cannabidiol, which does not make you high. The substance in marijuana that causes a buzz is a different cannabinoid, called THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol.

The legality of CBD products can be confusing. CBD products made from certain cannabis plant varieties are legal only in states where marijuana is legal, due to the potential THC content. CBD products made from hemp variety plants are legal throughout the United States as long as they contain less than 0.3% of THC and do not make any medical claims. (A hemp plant is defined as Cannabis sativa that contains less than 0.3% THC.)