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can cbd oil interact with medications

Some medications changed by the liver include proton pump inhibitors including omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); diazepam (Valium); carisoprodol (Soma); nelfinavir (Viracept); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.
Some medications changed by the liver include amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), chloroquine (Aralen), diclofenac (Voltaren), paclitaxel (Taxol), repaglinide (Prandin) and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill made it legal to sell hemp and hemp products in the U.S. But that doesn’t mean that all hemp-derived cannabidiol products are legal. Since cannabidiol has been studied as a new drug, it can’t be legally included in foods or dietary supplements. Also, cannabidiol can’t be included in products marketed with therapeutic claims. Cannabidiol can only be included in “cosmetic” products and only if it contains less than 0.3% THC. But there are still products labeled as dietary supplements on the market that contain cannabidiol. The amount of cannabidiol contained in these products is not always reported accurately on the product label.

Some medications changed by the liver include nicotine, chlormethiazole (Heminevrin), coumarin, methoxyflurane (Penthrox), halothane (Fluothane), valproic acid (Depacon), disulfiram (Antabuse), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Are there safety concerns?

Some medications changed by the liver include theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), omeprazole (Prilosec, Omesec), clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo), progesterone (Prometrium, others), lansoprazole (Prevacid), flutamide (Eulexin), oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), erlotinib (Tarceva), and caffeine. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), flecainide (Tambocor), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), ondansetron (Zofran), paroxetine (Paxil), risperidone (Risperdal), tramadol (Ultram), venlafaxine (Effexor), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include alprazolam (Xanax), amlodipine (Norvasc), clarithromycin (Biaxin), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), erythromycin, lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin) and many others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Children: A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in doses up to 25 mg/kg daily. This product is approved for use in certain children 1 year of age and older.

“There is no role right now for CBD in managing mental disorders that I [treat], such as depression, bipolar disorder … anxiety and ADHD,” he says. “We just don’t have the evidence that supports [it].”

And shoppers are buying it, so to speak—one recent report indicated that CBD sales are expected to hit $16 billion by 2026, up from just over $1 billion in 2018. But what exactly is CBD, and is it safe for people who are using prescription medications? Before using it, it’s important to learn about the potential CBD drug interactions.

But claims that CBD aids in the treatment of certain mental health and psychiatric conditions, don’t pass muster, says Roger McIntyre, MD , professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto.

Does CBD interact with medications?

Despite the not-so-great news about CBD for patients using tacrolimus, for some people, CBD is actually life-changing in a positive way. In 2018, for example, the CBD-derived medication Epidiolex received FDA approval for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, two very rare and very severe forms of epilepsy.

Furthermore, most prescription medications used to manage these conditions are metabolized by cytochrome P450, making it entirely possible that CBD could interfere with—rather than enhance—treatment.

Dr. McIntrye, who co-authored a 2018 study that concluded that healthcare providers need more information about drug-drug interactions with CBD and psychotropic medication, says much of the information out there is confusing and contradictory. Therefore, he echoes Dr. Alloway’s statement that it is absolutely prudent that patients clear the use of CBD with their doctor before giving it a go.

“Herbal products are drugs,” says Rita Alloway, Pharm.D. , research professor of nephrology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. “Just because [something] is herbal … doesn’t mean it can’t interact with any of the pharmaceutically manufactured drugs that you may be taking.”

View interaction reports for cannabis and the medicines listed below.

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Drug Interaction Classification

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

A total of 380 drugs are known to interact with cannabis categorized as 26 major, 354 moderate, and 0 minor interactions.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.